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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

"Barrier Beach""


Barrier Beach

When my friend Mia and I went to Cape Cod to paint, we both found it very difficult to get started at our first stop to paint at Gray's Beach. It was too sunny and hot; I couldn’t set up the easel with the umbrella because the wind would blow it away. I set up the chair and then realized that the tide was coming in too fast to do the painting that way. Then I moved the chair and tried again, but the rocks kept getting covered with too much water. And my feet hurt, and I felt all discombobulated. So I did the best I could and when we quit, was delighted to find a lunch place with air conditioning. Later in the studio, I reworked the painting and combined three different images. What made it work was more rocks, bigger rocks, and water coming right under the chair.

Each time I start a painting series, I have incredible barriers to overcome. This trip was no exception. There’s that lesson from Mom again – where there’s a will there’s a way……..and my own translations: just keep on keeping on, and put one foot in front of the other…….eventually you will make it. Thanks Mom, again, for this lesson.
                       
                       
                 

4 comments:

  1. I'm from New England and read your comment with nostalgia! I find, however, when I take fotos and then paint in my studio from the fotos, thatI tend to copy the photos carefully. Is that "as truthful" as paintings done in "pleine aire"? I was always told not to copy fotos. How do you get inspired art that way? Maybe I have to try to develop more immagination?

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  2. This is a wonderful question, one I struggled with for years. and because my answer got so long, I am sending it out as my next post!

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  3. I don't paint but I do like to photograph places and moments I want to remember. In the best of these, there is a quality that evokes a memory. A moment in time, the slant of the sun, a feeling of wonder and gratitude for being there. Could a photo be used as a reference a passport to journey back in memory to recapture the experience of the witness? I'm guessing like singing there must be a degree of interpretation between the artist and the event.

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  4. I have always seen my creating art as a conversation between me, my paintbrush and whatever I am painting (usually something from nature). When the connection stops, the painting starts to die and I have to say to myself stop! NOW!

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